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occultarchives:

JADE
Folk Name: Piedra de Hijada (Spanish, “Stone of the Flank”)Energy: ReceptivePlanet: VenusElement: WaterDeities: Kwan Yin, Maat, BuddhaPowers: Love, Healing, Longevity, Wisdom, Protection, Gardening, Prosperity, Money
Magical/Ritual Lore:
Jade has been used to create musical instruments, including xylophones, gongs and wind chimes. When the stone is struck, it produces a resonant tone. Such instruments were used in ritual in China, throughout Africa and by the Hopi Indians.
Jade was and is a sacred stone in China. Altars of the Moon and Earth were fashioned of jade, as were images of Buddha and various deities.
The stone was often included in grave goods in China because it was thought to lend vitality to the deceased. Jade carved in the image of two men was exchanged between males as a token of friendship.
In New Zealand, the Maori carve nephrite (a stone related to jade) into images of ancestral figures, usually set with mother-of-pearl eyes. Called hei tiki, these figures are worn on ceremonial occasions.
The stone itself is considered to be fortunate. Jade is believed to have power over the weather. It was thrown into water with great force in order to bring mist, rain or snow.
Magical Uses:
Jade is an ancient love-attracting stone. Carved into a butterfly, in China it is worn to draw love, or is given to another in the hope of obtaining love. It was a frequent engagement gift from woman to man. Jade is also presented by a man to his bride before their wedding. 
The soothing green color of jade is also healing. Wearing the stone helps the body to heal itself while working through the underlying, nonphysical problems which manifested the disease. It is particularly helpful for kidney, heart and stomach complaints.
Jade can be used to prevent disease and health troubles. The ancient Mayans wore jade amulets to guard against kidney disease and bladder problems.
The Chinese sensed in jade the power to prolong life. It was carved into images such as bats, bears and storks and worn for this purpose.
Likewise, jade bowls were used in meals because the Chinese believed the stone’s energy permeated the food before it was consumed.
A piece of jade is worn while gardening to improve the health of the plants. Four pieces of jade buried along the garden’s perimeter are also effective for this purpose.
Wearing jade can bring money into your life. Charge a jade pendant or ring with money-attracting energies, then wear it and consciously allow yourself to receive money. Create a positive attitude toward money and visualize yourself using it productively, creatively. Gloomy visions of the “problems” money brings will effectively cut you off from it.
When contemplating a business deal, hold a piece of jade in your receptive hand for a few moments. Be infused with its prosperous energies. Then decide which course to take.
Jade is worn, carried or placed against the third eye to receive wisdom. Wisdom, by the way, isn’t knowledge. It is assimilated knowledge rightly applied or withheld. Jade strengthens the mental faculties and helps reasoning.
This stone is also protective, guarding against accidents and mishaps which proper attentiveness can avert. It is also placed on the altar with purple candles or worn during defensive magic.
Just for fun, here’s an old spell: Take a perfectly square piece of jade. Carve the numbers 1, 8, 1, and 1 on the square, one number in each corner.
Mount the stone in pure gold. As the Sun rises, turn to face it and breathe on the amulet three times. Then say “Thoth” 500 times. Wait until sunset, then again exhale thrice upon the stone and repeat ”Thoth” 500 times. Once this is done, the amulet is finished. Tie a red thread around it and carry with you to guard against others imposing their will on you.
[Source: Cunningham’s Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem, & Metal Magic by Scott Cunningham]
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occultarchives:

JADE
Folk Name: Piedra de Hijada (Spanish, “Stone of the Flank”)Energy: ReceptivePlanet: VenusElement: WaterDeities: Kwan Yin, Maat, BuddhaPowers: Love, Healing, Longevity, Wisdom, Protection, Gardening, Prosperity, Money
Magical/Ritual Lore:
Jade has been used to create musical instruments, including xylophones, gongs and wind chimes. When the stone is struck, it produces a resonant tone. Such instruments were used in ritual in China, throughout Africa and by the Hopi Indians.
Jade was and is a sacred stone in China. Altars of the Moon and Earth were fashioned of jade, as were images of Buddha and various deities.
The stone was often included in grave goods in China because it was thought to lend vitality to the deceased. Jade carved in the image of two men was exchanged between males as a token of friendship.
In New Zealand, the Maori carve nephrite (a stone related to jade) into images of ancestral figures, usually set with mother-of-pearl eyes. Called hei tiki, these figures are worn on ceremonial occasions.
The stone itself is considered to be fortunate. Jade is believed to have power over the weather. It was thrown into water with great force in order to bring mist, rain or snow.
Magical Uses:
Jade is an ancient love-attracting stone. Carved into a butterfly, in China it is worn to draw love, or is given to another in the hope of obtaining love. It was a frequent engagement gift from woman to man. Jade is also presented by a man to his bride before their wedding. 
The soothing green color of jade is also healing. Wearing the stone helps the body to heal itself while working through the underlying, nonphysical problems which manifested the disease. It is particularly helpful for kidney, heart and stomach complaints.
Jade can be used to prevent disease and health troubles. The ancient Mayans wore jade amulets to guard against kidney disease and bladder problems.
The Chinese sensed in jade the power to prolong life. It was carved into images such as bats, bears and storks and worn for this purpose.
Likewise, jade bowls were used in meals because the Chinese believed the stone’s energy permeated the food before it was consumed.
A piece of jade is worn while gardening to improve the health of the plants. Four pieces of jade buried along the garden’s perimeter are also effective for this purpose.
Wearing jade can bring money into your life. Charge a jade pendant or ring with money-attracting energies, then wear it and consciously allow yourself to receive money. Create a positive attitude toward money and visualize yourself using it productively, creatively. Gloomy visions of the “problems” money brings will effectively cut you off from it.
When contemplating a business deal, hold a piece of jade in your receptive hand for a few moments. Be infused with its prosperous energies. Then decide which course to take.
Jade is worn, carried or placed against the third eye to receive wisdom. Wisdom, by the way, isn’t knowledge. It is assimilated knowledge rightly applied or withheld. Jade strengthens the mental faculties and helps reasoning.
This stone is also protective, guarding against accidents and mishaps which proper attentiveness can avert. It is also placed on the altar with purple candles or worn during defensive magic.
Just for fun, here’s an old spell: Take a perfectly square piece of jade. Carve the numbers 1, 8, 1, and 1 on the square, one number in each corner.
Mount the stone in pure gold. As the Sun rises, turn to face it and breathe on the amulet three times. Then say “Thoth” 500 times. Wait until sunset, then again exhale thrice upon the stone and repeat ”Thoth” 500 times. Once this is done, the amulet is finished. Tie a red thread around it and carry with you to guard against others imposing their will on you.
[Source: Cunningham’s Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem, & Metal Magic by Scott Cunningham]
Zoom Info

occultarchives:

JADE

Folk Name: Piedra de Hijada (Spanish, “Stone of the Flank”)
Energy: Receptive
Planet: Venus
Element: Water
Deities: Kwan Yin, Maat, Buddha
Powers: Love, Healing, Longevity, Wisdom, Protection, Gardening, Prosperity, Money

Magical/Ritual Lore:

Jade has been used to create musical instruments, including xylophones, gongs and wind chimes. When the stone is struck, it produces a resonant tone. Such instruments were used in ritual in China, throughout Africa and by the Hopi Indians.

Jade was and is a sacred stone in China. Altars of the Moon and Earth were fashioned of jade, as were images of Buddha and various deities.

The stone was often included in grave goods in China because it was thought to lend vitality to the deceased. Jade carved in the image of two men was exchanged between males as a token of friendship.

In New Zealand, the Maori carve nephrite (a stone related to jade) into images of ancestral figures, usually set with mother-of-pearl eyes. Called hei tiki, these figures are worn on ceremonial occasions.

The stone itself is considered to be fortunate. Jade is believed to have power over the weather. It was thrown into water with great force in order to bring mist, rain or snow.

Magical Uses:

Jade is an ancient love-attracting stone. Carved into a butterfly, in China it is worn to draw love, or is given to another in the hope of obtaining love. It was a frequent engagement gift from woman to man. Jade is also presented by a man to his bride before their wedding. 

The soothing green color of jade is also healing. Wearing the stone helps the body to heal itself while working through the underlying, nonphysical problems which manifested the disease. It is particularly helpful for kidney, heart and stomach complaints.

Jade can be used to prevent disease and health troubles. The ancient Mayans wore jade amulets to guard against kidney disease and bladder problems.

The Chinese sensed in jade the power to prolong life. It was carved into images such as bats, bears and storks and worn for this purpose.

Likewise, jade bowls were used in meals because the Chinese believed the stone’s energy permeated the food before it was consumed.

A piece of jade is worn while gardening to improve the health of the plants. Four pieces of jade buried along the garden’s perimeter are also effective for this purpose.

Wearing jade can bring money into your life. Charge a jade pendant or ring with money-attracting energies, then wear it and consciously allow yourself to receive money. Create a positive attitude toward money and visualize yourself using it productively, creatively. Gloomy visions of the “problems” money brings will effectively cut you off from it.

When contemplating a business deal, hold a piece of jade in your receptive hand for a few moments. Be infused with its prosperous energies. Then decide which course to take.

Jade is worn, carried or placed against the third eye to receive wisdom. Wisdom, by the way, isn’t knowledge. It is assimilated knowledge rightly applied or withheld. Jade strengthens the mental faculties and helps reasoning.

This stone is also protective, guarding against accidents and mishaps which proper attentiveness can avert. It is also placed on the altar with purple candles or worn during defensive magic.

Just for fun, here’s an old spell: Take a perfectly square piece of jade. Carve the numbers 1, 8, 1, and 1 on the square, one number in each corner.

Mount the stone in pure gold. As the Sun rises, turn to face it and breathe on the amulet three times. Then say “Thoth” 500 times. Wait until sunset, then again exhale thrice upon the stone and repeat ”Thoth” 500 times. Once this is done, the amulet is finished. Tie a red thread around it and carry with you to guard against others imposing their will on you.

[Source: Cunningham’s Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem, & Metal Magic by Scott Cunningham]

iprefergin:

Kwan Yin
Kwan Yin’s esoteric attributes are those of compassion, healing, and centering.
She lives in the heart chakra, standing in full acceptance, suspended in tranquillity, relishing joy in the silence.

SUGGESTED MANTRA:  COMPASSION 

SUGGESTED AFFIRMATIONS:

  • I forgive
  • I radiate love
  • I am tolerant of everyone around me
  • I have great joy, and therefore great energy
  • My peace is shared peace
  • I am weightless and free of burden

GEMSTONES: Rose quartz, pink tourmaline, emerald (pink or green stones)

artist: zeng hao. pinkafied by me using: transparent flowers 

She told me she likes light blue stones, too.

the-fairestprincess:

Mythology Picspam  Quan Yin

Kwan Yin (“She Who Hears the Prayers of the World”) was originally the mother goddess of China, who proved so popular She was adopted into the Buddhist pantheon as a bodhisattva. A bodhisattva is a person who has attained enlightenment but chooses to forgo Nirvana and remain in the world to help others attain enlightenment. Kwan Yin’s specialty is compassion, and She is known as the Goddess of Mercy. Before She became a bodhisattva, Kwan Yin was a princess named Miao Shan. As Miao Shan She endured many trials, especially from Her father, who wanted Her to marry. But She refused, and instead dedicated Her life to Buddhism. (x)

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